Friday, 28 November 2014

Ischemic Preconditioning Paper

This paper was the result of an excellent collaboration with Professor Derek Yellon and his team at the Hatter Institute in University College London. We looked at different "doses" of ischemic preconditioning to understand better how to apply this conditioning intervention. The results are quite interesting and I hope this paper will be helpful for individuals designing RIPC interventions in various populations.

The abstract is below and the article can be downloaded here

 2014 Nov 20;2(11). pii: e12200. Print 2014 Nov 1.

Characterization of acute ischemia-related physiological responses associated with remote ischemic preconditioning: a randomized controlled, crossover human study.

Abstract

Remote Ischemic Preconditioning (RIPC) is emerging as a new noninvasive intervention that has the potential to protect a number of organs against ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. The standard protocols normally used to deliver RIPC involve a number of cycles of inflation of a blood pressure (BP) cuff on the arm and/or leg to an inflation pressure of 200 mmHg followed by cuff deflation for a short period of time. There is little evidence to support what limb (upper or lower) or cuff inflation pressures are most effective to deliver this intervention without causing undue discomfort/pain in nonanesthetized humans. In this preliminary study, a dose-response assessment was performed using a range of cuff inflation pressures (140, 160, and 180 mmHg) to induce limb ischemia in upper and lower limbs. Physiological changes in the occluded limb and any pain/discomfort associated with RIPC with each cuff inflation pressure were determined. Results showed that ischemia can be induced in the upper limb at much lower cuff inflation pressures compared with the standard 200 mmHg pressure generally used for RIPC, provided the cuff inflation pressure is ~30 mmHg higher than the resting systolic BP. In the lower limb, a higher inflation pressure, (~55 mmHg > resting systolic BP), is required to induce ischemia. Cyclical changes in capillary blood O2, CO2, and lactate levels during the RIPC stimulus were observed. RIPC at higher cuff inflation pressures of 160 and 180 mmHg was better tolerated in the upper limb. In summary, limb ischemia for RIPC can be more easily induced at lower pressures and is much better tolerated in the upper limb in young healthy individuals. However, whether benefits of RIPC can also be derived with protocols delivered to the upper limb using lower cuff inflation pressures and with lesser discomfort compared to the lower limb, remains to be investigated.
© 2014 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

KEYWORDS: 

Characterization; cuff inflation pressure; remote ischemic preconditioning; tolerability

Finally, here is a picture of myself being a guinea pig for the pilot work (which I have done for almost all studies I published). If you are a young sports scientists running experiments, you should always experience what you will be asking your volunteers to do for you and for science. It will make your methods better but most of all you will make sure that your volunteers are well looked after.




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